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Yom Kippur


Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is a fasting holiday and considered one of the most holy days of the Jewish calendar. It falls on the Hebrew calendar on the ninth of Tishri. As all Jewish holidays, it begins at sunset on that day and continues until nightfall. It is a day to “afflict the soul” and to make right the sins of the past year.

Jewish people fast and attend synagogue for most of the day. They walk to the synagogue, wear all white, and do not wear leather on their feet. Fasting means they do not eat or drink water. The white clothing is a symbol and reflection of the Scripture from Isaiah 1:18 that although our “sins may be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow.”

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September 2, 2018

A Rabbi Looks at the Fall Feasts

As summer winds down and the autumn of the year approaches, we enter into an extremely important period in the Jewish calendar known as the Fall Feasts. In fact, three…

Posted in home_page_featured_post | By Rabbi Jonathan Bernis Read more ›
September 24, 2017

Yom Kippur | The Thriller?

Cue the dark and mysterious music in your head. Dim the lights. A little more. Now whisper with me in grave tones…The Day of Atonement. It sounds like something out…

Posted in Jewish Holidays | By Jonathan Moore Read more ›
February 21, 2017

Learn About Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is a fasting holiday and considered one of the most holy days of the Jewish calendar. It falls on the Hebrew calendar on the ninth of Tishri. As…

Posted in Jewish Holidays | By MJBI Read more ›
September 22, 2014

Yom Kippur

Ancient Ritual Still Speaks

Jewish Days of Distinction A Messianic Study of the Jewish Feasts and Holidays “In addition to the Sabbath, these are the LORD’s appointed festivals, the official days for holy assembly…

Posted in Jewish Holidays | By Bonnie Saul Wilks Read more ›
September 23, 2013

Yiddish Mama’s Kitchen: Yom Kippur Break-Fast Menu

The holiest day on the Jewish calendar, Yom Kippur or Day of Atonement, is commemorated eight-days after Rosh HaShanah or the New Year. Fasting food and drink and not working from sundown to sundown is customary for observers. Below is a break-fast menu that is traditional for North American Jews for concluding this somber feast with a joyous and easy menu. No baking necessary, this meal is a breeze to have in the fridge and pull out and assemble. It is light and easy on the stomach after fasting.

Posted in Jewish Holidays | By Bonnie Saul Wilks, MJBI Staff Writer Read more ›

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